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November 18, 2008

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An excellent, yet simple overview of the trend. I have already recommended it to a leader of a local association of churches. Where can I find more detailed information?

This is a topic Leadership Network will continue to research and explore during 2009. At present no book exists on mergers in their current developments. You find occasional magazine articles, such as this excellent one by Jim Tomberlin, http://www.churchsolutionsmag.com/articles/churches-embrace-mergers-through-multisite.html.

I found this after our Admin. Pastor did an excellent post of our merger with an 82 year old church last year. I then added my own personal thought and a few links as well as this one.
For more info . You can go to http://guymelton.typepad.com/my_weblog/2008/11/campus-update-a-year-laterfollowing-mergerl.html and find my post and the link to our Admin. Pastors.

> "At present no book exists on mergers in their current developments. You find occasional magazine articles, such as this excellent one by Jim Tomberlin..."

I considered publishing my dissertation on church mergers, but still haven't gotten around to it. If you're interested in seeing the abstract, go here:
http://home.comcast.net/~rlaribee/merger.html

Excellent article.
I merged my church in 2008 that was 30 months old at the time and growing with a 53 year old church who was experiencing stagnation in many areas. After coming together within 90 days, I later found out that the long-standing church had more financial and other challenges than was originally disclosed (not done purposely). Nevertheless, we know it was the plan of God so with all the discoveries, we maintained our speed and kept moving. There are still challenges as we ahead, but the accomplishments and lives that are being changed, outweighed the challenges and obstacles. There needs to be more forums and support groups for church mergers. In fact, someone should write a book (I'll be willing to be a contributor). It is quite humbling for both parties. I am willing to share my experiences I have had thus far with anyone who it may be of help.

the above examples are from the perspective of a stagnant church contacting a growing church. are there any great examples of "the other way around" - where an area growing church identifies several stagnant churches in the local area and begins intentional conversations with them about mergers, partnership, etc? I know the stagnant church has to actually realize it's stagnant for the conversation to go anywhere, but what are some helpful "conversation" starters?

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